Cow Moose

Ron Niebrugge Alaska, Travel 12 Comments

A pregnant ? cow moose near Seward, Alaska.

A pregnant ? cow moose near Seward, Alaska.

This is the time of year that baby moose start to show up everywhere.  I have been on the look-out, but haven’t found any out in the open enough for a photo.  But, this gal looks like a good possibility, she definitly appeared pregnant, and is hanging around a scenic area not too far from town – I’ll be keeping an eye one her.  🙂

Comments 12

  1. She’s lovely — I really like the curious expression you captured on her face too. Here’s to hoping you find some little ones as well!

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    Thanks a lot everyone! @ Richard – moose heads are huge!

    Was out last night but now luck – I’ll keep trying.

  3. Love the shots of the moose! Triplets, no less. Wow! Hope the rest of them survive not just the bears but the subsistance hunters.

  4. This is the time of year that baby moose start to show up everywhere. I have been on the look-out, but haven’t found any out in the open enough for a photo. But, this gal looks like a good possibility, she definitly appeared pregnant, and is hanging around a scenic area not too far from town – I’ll be keeping an eye one her.

  5. No Dragons Here

    What do you need if you want to travel to a new place, a place you have never visited before? One thing you will need is a map. You will use a road map if you are taking a road trip. If you are traveling by air, you might want to look at an atlas to see the land over which you will fly.
    Finding your way is not the only reason for using a map. You can learn a lot from a map! There are maps that show different land features, maps that show the borders of cities, parishes, states, or countries, and maps that show the crops and manufacturing or mining products of an area. Depending on how a map will be used, different information is included on the map. Think about road maps that you have seen. Some road maps only show major routes and highways, while others might show all of the streets of a much smaller area, such as one part of a city. No map could contain all of the information about an area, even if that area was very small.
    If you were going to draw a map of your neighborhood, you would include different information, depending on how you were planning to use the map. To give directions to a friend who had never visited your house, you would draw a map that showed the street names and landmarks your friend would need in order to find your house. To show someone what is special about your neighborhood, you might leave out some street names and landmarks. Instead, you would add the unique features of your neighborhood, such as the park where you like to play catch or the tree on the corner that has a bird’s nest every spring, or the woods where you let your dog run. You could draw pictures, or symbols, to show the different features of your neighborhood.

    4 Mapmakers have always used symbols on maps. Symbols may represent features of the land or sea. Symbols may also represent important ideas of the time. Although many symbols have been used to tell people about the lands on maps, mapmakers have also used drawings as decorations. Maps used by sailors in the 1400s show pictures of sea creatures and maps used by explorers sometimes had drawings to show that there were forests or mountains.
    Early mapmakers drew pictures of dragons and monsters on their maps at the borders of the known world. A warning would appear above the picture: “Here there be dragons.” This warning was used to help keep explorers from sailing into danger. However, Michael Livingston, who studies the history of the Middle Ages, wrote an article that says this is a myth and has no truth at all.
    Michael Livingston also disagrees with the story about Columbus setting sail in order to prove the earth is round, not flat. History shows that Livingston is right. One of the earliest maps that we have today does show the earth as a flat circle. This map was made sometime around 500 B.C. in Iraq, then known as Babylonia. This “flat-circle” view did not last. Nearly 700 years later, a Greek mapmaker named Ptolemy drew maps that showed a round earth that looks like the globe we use today.
    Maps today are no longer drawn by hand. Explorers no longer sail the world to bring back descriptions of coastlines. Since the 1950s, mapmakers have used information gathered from satellites to make maps. The satellites have special equipment that senses light reflections from the earth, even reflections that we cannot see with our eyes alone. These reflections give information about different land features. This information is used to make pictures that are then used to make maps that are more accurate than any maps in history, maps that probably won’t have any dragons.

  6. About once every year, my yellow dog Buster
    gets into some kind of trouble. Last year, he accidentally lock
    himself in the barn when the wind slammed the door closed
    behind him. He was trapped there. Buster barked for hours
    until I finally herd him and ran to the rescue.
    This year, he darted off across our field and disappeared
    into the deep gully at the edge of the yard. He was gone for a
    long time, but my parents’ found him when they
    followed the barking. It turned out that Buster had caught his
    collar on a long low tree branch and couldnt get free.
    Since that time, his name became the Great Gully Mutt.
    He’s a friendly dog but he still needs me to keep an eye
    on him.

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